While symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD) typically appear during the first five years of life, it can sometimes be difficult to diagnose because of the broad range of symptoms. Due to the difference in range of abilities for children on the spectrum, it can also be a challenge to find the right treatment to

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Chris D'Adamo, PhD

Meet Zeek, who has just turned five. He likes to eat chicken nuggets, fish sticks, buttered noodles, and Ritz crackers. Oh, and cookies. He will eat any kind of cookies, so long as they have a crunch. Before the age of two, he ate a wide variety of fruits and vegetables, but now, it’s pulling

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Neiger, MS, BCBA

Joyful traditions during the holiday season can bring a new set of challenges for children with ASD, especially those who have feeding deficits.  Gatherings that include family meals bring new flavors, smells, and tastes that can be overwhelming for a child with sensory sensitivities. Involving your child in the kitchen when making holiday dishes can

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Rebecca Connick, MOT, LOTR

Just the mere thought of Halloween can send many autism moms into a tailspin. Ah, yes, Halloween. The time of year when little devils feast on candy and bounce around the house until midnight. Then, when their sugar levels start to crash, they load up on more refined sugar, additives, nitrates, and artificial colors—all the

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Ruthangela Bernadette

Diet has long been associated with healthy living, but it remains a little-known fact that it can also play a significant role in managing autism. Studies over the years have shown a healthy diet is crucial to the prevention and management of neurological disorders, and autism is no exception. But parents often don’t know where

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by M. Walid Qoronfleh, PhD

Leaky gut, also known as increased intestinal permeability, is a digestive disorder that develops when tight junctions loosen or become damaged, allowing undigested food, bacteria, or toxins to leak through the wall of the intestine1. Tight junctions are small gaps in the intestinal lining that promote the transfer of nutrients while preventing undesirable compounds from

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Denise Voight, MS

It’s that dreaded time again. You open the refrigerator door and scan the wholesome ingredients that seem to mock you with their bright, healthy colors in illuminating shades of greens and yellows. “Easy meals” on Pinterest and books on “picky eaters” clearly do not know the true definition of your child’s eating habits. Another monochromatic

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by JC Ellinger, MBA

Most children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) also have chronic digestive issues1 such as leaky gut and constipation – because their gut bacteria (microbiome) are out of balance. As parents know, these gut disorders often lead to a child’s irritability. The good news is that scientists are now finding that simply increasing soluble fiber

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Shawn Talbott, PhD

For centuries, the use of omega-3 fatty acids from fish oils has been recommended for cardiovascular health, but nowadays, omega-3s are becoming increasingly popular due to their clinically proven benefits toward enhancing mental health. There are two main types of omega-3 fatty acids, known as EPA (Eicosapentaenoic Acid) and DHA (Docosahexaenoic Acid), which boost mental

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Denise Voight, MS

Children with autism can be taught how to enjoy assisting with meal preparation in the kitchen. Here is a list of ten ways your child can benefit by being involved with meal preparation. 1. Grow your own foodWhat better way to learn about various food items than to grow your own? Your child with autism can

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Ron Malcolm, EdD

Many parents and caregivers of children with autism are using nutrition to modify and manage some behaviors that come with being on the spectrum. Before learning about popular autism diet options for your child, it’s important to understand how nutrition plays a part in autism. While nutrition or special diets do not cure autism, there

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Kim Barloso, AB

What is GABA? Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is responsible for “reducing neuronal excitability throughout the nervous system.” By decreasing activity in the nervous system, GABA aid in reducing fight or flight responses such as fear, anxiety, aggression, stress, and agitation. Research suggests it might also

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Katherine G. Hobbs, AA

The phrase “picky eating” is often misused when describing the eating habits of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This over generalized term more accurately describes a toddler who has a strong opinion about what they want for dinner; not a child with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) with significant food refusal. As a parent of

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Rebecca Connick, MOT, LOTR

Picky eating isn’t uncommon to anyone who has or works with children. Most parents know there are only a handful of foods their children will eat, and getting them to try new foods is often challenging. Picky eating, or food selectivity, has a much higher prevalence in children who are on the autism spectrum compared

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by William Killion, PhD, BCBA

The other day a friend of mine was talking to me in detail about the entirely “non-processed and made from scratch” breakfast that she had prepared for her children. I nodded pleasantly, giving her kudos. She then went on to ask the question that I was dreading… “So, what did you feed your daughter today?”

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Emily Davidson

Did you know that with over 90 trillion bacteria cells in our bodies we have more bacteria than human cells? This is something that is strange to think about but can have more impact on our health that we could have imagined. One of the areas in our bodies where bacteria has a significant influence

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Casey Ames

As many parents already know, medications for managing autism spectrum disorder (ASD) can cause challenging side effects. For the common symptoms of irritability and agitation, only two drugs are FDA approved—risperidone and aripiprazole—and unfortunately both can cause intense food cravings that lead to weight gain. The drugs are effective at reducing tantrums and aggression, so

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Michael Aman

Starting school or daycare is a big step for children; there are new routines to learn, new people, to get to know and a new building to navigate. for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who attend mainstream settings, these challenges are magnified. One of the aspects of school life that can cause a lot

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Jo Cormack, MA, MBACP

Why children might need vitamin and mineral supplements Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) have long been prescribed vitamins, minerals, and natural supplements to help with sleep, gastrointestinal distress, and boost low vitamin levels, all of which are common in children and adults with ASD. Quick Navigation Why children might need vitamin and mineral supplements

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Katherine G. Hobbs, AA

What is L-Carnosine? L-Carnosine is classified as a dipeptide, which is a compound made up of amino acid molecules that are linked together. It enhances frontal lobe function in the brain. Research suggests that it is also a powerful antioxidant. A synthetic form of carnosine is available and sold as a supplement to help treat

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Amy KD Tobik

Best Probiotics for Autism Autism researchers believe there is a strong link between the functioning of the brain and the gut. They claim that several types of diets and probiotics can help treat children with autism. With the very large number of foods and recommended diets out there, how can you determine what works best

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Amy KD Tobik

Proper nutrition paves the way for development, eliminating barriers and promoting growth. By being selective and deliberate in the foods your child eats, you can help improve his/her brain development and behavior. Children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) benefit most from organic diets. This type of diet features fewer toxins, making it easier for

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Matthew Newell

Recent clinical trials looking at gluten-free diets for children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are showing benefits worth considering. Typical indicators of autism spectrum in children may include delayed speech, lack of eye contact, impaired or non-present social skills, shyness, obsessive-type behaviors, delayed gross or fine motor skills, sensory integration issues (sound and touch sensitivity,

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Shawna Kunselman, MSACN

It’s not what you’re eating: it’s how you’re eating.  Dysphagia (swallowing disorder) has not received a lot of attention for individuals with autism. The symptoms may be mild, masked, or uneventful in the pediatric population.  Dysphagia may be noted, but in the big picture, it may not be a priority.  Further evaluation and treatment of

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Dr. Marybeth Ames

Picky Eating is the common term for what Picky Eaters do. These children are hard to please and to feed in general, but they rarely end up starving themselves. Patterns of over-selecting food are common among children with developmental disorders, but they are also common among all children. Estimates vary widely among studies, but in

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by David Sponder, MSE

We are always looking for something new and something better. What’s the newest invention? What’s the newest discovery? Where’s the answer that’s going to change my world! It’s that constant and never ending hope that propels our search. The need for 100% is necessary. While we should always have gratitude for the things we have,

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Jared M. Skowron, ND

Introduction: The definition of a “vitamin” or “essential mineral” is that the lack of that vitamin or mineral results in disease or even death. The Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) is the minimum amount required to prevent disease, but may be less than the amount needed for optimal mental and physical health. Most people in the

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by James Adams, PhD

I find the suggestion that there needs to be a cure for autism an absolutely ridiculous notion. Coming as I do from a family where many of our men-folk exhibit spectrum behavior, spending much of their time in the garden shed whittling or inventing, my child fits right in with our collective history of quiet,

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Sarah Patten

Sivakumari asks: My daughter loves to eat ice-cream and cake. She will get angry and scream if we do not buy it. How can I stop her from doing this? Also, it is true that sugary foods make children with autism more hyperactive? Hi Sivakumari, thanks for your questions. Your daughter is a girl after

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Angelina M., MS, BCBA, LMFT

This is the question of the month as featured in Issue Number 7 Q: What is GFCF? A: GFCF stands for Gluten-Free and Casein-Free Q: What is gluten? A: In Living Gluten Free for Dummies by Danna Korn, “Gluten is a mixture of proteins in wheat, rye, and barley. Oats don’t have gluten but may

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Leslie Burby

One of the practical ways that we can help reduce the effects of autism is diet. We are very big on the effects of diet at Autism Parenting magazine as a way to help work with Autism. Recent studies have indicated marked improvements in behavior and symptoms for children that have used a Casein and

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in Autism Diet and Nutrition by Mark Blakey