Autistic children sometimes need more support than neurotypical children as they grow up. Autism can come with challenges in school, social interactions, the professional world, and daily life, not to mention the various medical issues that may occur alongside being on the spectrum. Parents and caregivers of autistic kids know they are especially important to

in Autism Parenting Advice by Claire Delano, BA

Aggression is a common issue for both children and adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). It may be verbal (shouting, screaming, cursing) and/or physical (hitting, kicking, biting, destroying property, self-injury).  Some research suggests that children with autism are more likely to show aggressive behaviors than typically developing children and children with other developmental disabilities. People

in Autism Behavioral Solutions by Claire Delano, BA

Intense tantrums, aggression, and self-injury are some of the most worrying symptoms associated with autism. These behaviors are usually addressed with therapy, but doctors may decide that medication is needed.  Risperidone is an antipsychotic sometimes prescribed to children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Let’s explore what this drug does and whether it’s effective for kids

in Autism Therapies and Treatments by Claire Delano, BA

It’s common for children with autism to have one or more speech-language problems, from delayed first words to childhood apraxia of speech. One you might not have heard of is a fluency disorder called “cluttering.” What is cluttering in speech? Fluency disorders cause problems with the rhythm, speed, and flow of speech. Stuttering, the most

in Communication Skills by Claire Delano, BA

All children lie at some point, usually to avoid getting in trouble. That doesn’t mean they do it well—after all, who else but your toddler would scribble all over the walls? Most children with autism struggle with abstract concepts, social communication, and interpreting things literally, so as a parent, you might wonder: Can my child

in Autism Behavioral Solutions by Claire Delano, BA

Most people strive to be respectful when discussing someone with different abilities. This often leads to questions about what language is appropriate—for example, is it better to say “autistic person” or “person with autism”?  Another term you may have heard and have questions about is “autist”. Where does this word come from, who uses it,

in Autism Advocacy by Claire Delano, BA

When most people hear the term “post-traumatic stress disorder,” or PTSD, they probably picture adult war veterans, abuse survivors, or natural disaster victims. All of these things can cause PTSD, for sure, but sadly, many children face this condition, too―including children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). What is PTSD? Post-traumatic stress disorder is exactly what

in Autism Health and Medical Info by Claire Delano, BA

All parents eagerly anticipate the moment their baby speaks for the first time. Maybe you have a baby journal with a blank space to write down that first word and all the other milestones. Maybe you sit up and pay attention every time your child gurgles and babbles. Maybe you’ve been waiting…and waiting…and waiting…and you’re

in Communication Skills by Claire Delano, BA

Difficulties with speech are not uncommon for children with autism. They may experience speech delays, childhood apraxia of speech, idiosyncratic speech, or be nonverbal into adulthood.  Another speech phenomenon sometimes found in people with autism is pressured speech. What causes this type of speaking, and what kind of treatment is available? Let’s take a look.

in Communication Skills by Claire Delano, BA

Diagnosing mental conditions can be tricky, and autism is no exception. Over the years, our understanding of autism and developmental disorders, in general, has evolved a lot, but that means it can be hard to keep track of all the subcategories and definitions that have popped up along the way.  One term you may have

in Autism Diagnosis by Claire Delano, BA

When you have a child or children with autism, you probably spend more time with doctors and therapists than most other families. First, there’s the search for a diagnosis, then there are potential treatments, not to mention the other conditions—such as ADHD or gastrointestinal issues—sometimes associated with ASD.  All this means you’ve almost certainly come

in Autism Diagnosis by Claire Delano, BA

People with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) have a wide range of abilities when it comes to speech and language skills. High functioning individuals may be perfectly fluent, others struggle, and some may remain nonverbal and communicate through other methods.  For many children with ASD, a delay in language development is one of the first signs

in Communication Skills by Claire Delano, BA

When people hear the word “autism,” they probably don’t picture babies. After all, most aren’t diagnosed until they’re toddlers or even older. But ASD does exist in infants, and detecting it early on can make a difference for your child’s behavioral development and functioning in the future. In this article, we’ll discuss what you can

in Autism Diagnosis by Claire Delano, BA

If you’re a parent, you’ve probably seen your child put something in his/her mouth that isn’t food. During the mouthing stage before the age of two, it’s normal for curious babies to try and chew on just about everything. But when children try to actually eat non-food items past this stage of development, they may

in Autism Health and Medical Info by Claire Delano, BA

Autism Warrior: Sheletta Brundidge Mother, author, broadcaster, and podcaster, Sheletta Brunbridge does it all. She has four children; the youngest three have autism spectrum disorder. She is a radio talk show host, a public television commentator, and the creator of SHElettamakesmelaugh.com, a platform that produces and distributes podcasts by and for people of color. Three

in Autism Advocacy by Claire Delano, BA

One of the most common symptoms of autism is difficulty with speech and language. Autism spectrum disorder is, well, a spectrum, so these difficulties may look very different for each autistic child. Some can speak fluently, while others will always be nonverbal. As a parent, you desperately want to communicate with your child—to understand their

in Communication Skills by Claire Delano, BA