Have you ever washed your face and instead of feeling a gentle trickle as hands touch the surface of your skin lathered with your favorite face wash, the motion of your hand touching your face causes an involuntary painful sensation? This form of experience is known as tactile hyperesthesia. Hyperesthesia is a condition defined by

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in Sensory Solutions by Andréas RB Deolinda, BA, BSC

Impaired somatosensory processing is often found in neurodevelopmental conditions. Researchers are paying closer attention to the meaning of deficits in this sensory system and its possible impact on autistic individuals. We’re all a little touchy about, well, touch at the moment. The pandemic’s social distancing made human touch a rare commodity. It left many craving

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in Sensory Solutions by Yolande Loftus, BA, LLB

Is the world too bright, too loud, too smelly…too everything for a brain in overdrive? Most parents have witnessed a tantrum or two. A meltdown, or an autistic brain trying to control sensory overload with a challenged filtering system, cannot be equated to a tantrum.   A tantrum is usually about getting something: attention, candy or

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in Sensory Solutions by Yolande Loftus, BA, LLB

When searching for information about your autistic child’s sensory challenges you may find many articles about hypersensitivity. But what about hyposensitivity, and the accompanying sensory seeking behavior of a child who finds the world an underwhelming place? As research discovers more about the autistic brain, we can’t help but marvel at some of the skills

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in Sensory Solutions by Yolande Loftus, BA, LLB

In our everyday lives, we process the world using our senses. Whether we’re sitting, walking, talking, or eating, more than one of our senses is involved so that each action is coordinated and understood accordingly.  Some children diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) find it difficult to process sensory information and integrate sensory stimuli. Because

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in Sensory Solutions by Andréas RB Deolinda, BA, BSC

When researcher Baron Cohen and his colleagues professed that synesthesia is more common (three times greater) in autism, many new questions surfaced for the curious parent. Another team of researchers used their study results to conclude that autistic individuals did not have a dysfunctional mirror neuron system. In this case, participants with autism could successfully

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in Sensory Solutions by Safia Fatima Mohiuddin

A sensory gym is a room that is completely dedicated to sensory play. Sensory gyms normally include equipment that is designed to provide vestibular and proprioceptive input. Some of the elements include therapy balls, trampolines, swings, and more.  When you give your autistic child access to a sensory gym, you will find that they gain

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in Sensory Solutions by Autism Parenting Articles

Sensory-friendly, autism-friendly, relaxed, and inclusive events are popping up across the country. TDF offers supported Broadway performances in New York City, the Space Center Houston opens its doors early every other month, and several stadiums and arenas now offer sensory bags to help with the intense stimulation. For individuals who cannot do big crowds, extreme

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in Sensory Solutions by Amanda Mahoney, PhD, BCBA-D

There has probably been at least a thousand people who have wondered what goes through the mind of someone with autism while he/she is in high school. The only thing most teen students on the spectrum could agree on is that it overflows into way too much junk in our heads. I don’t mean “junk” as in homework, I

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in Sensory Solutions by Clara Ham

As we all learned in elementary school, there are five basic senses that we use to process the world around us; touch, hearing, vision, smell, and taste.  Our sense organs (e.g., eyes, nose, etc.) receive information from the environment and relay that information to the brain for interpretation. Throughout the day, each of us processes

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in Sensory Solutions by Nicole M. Magaldi, PhD

What is a sensory room? A sensory room or sensory integration room is designed to provide calm, focus, and comfort to people with sensory processing problems, which often includes people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The American Psychiatric Association’s Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, known as  DSM-5, mentions the atypical response to specific

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in Sensory Solutions by Kim Barloso, AB

If you are caring for a child with autism, you are probably aware of sensory issues when it comes to clothing. Kids on the spectrum can be overly sensitive to clothing tags, seams, and textures that are not comfortable for them. Fortunately, some clothing companies are now making autism apparel that is affordable and available

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in Sensory Solutions by Kim Barloso, AB

Hello, my fellow sensory seeking moms and dads! Let me start by introducing myself. I am the mother of two young autistic children who require TONS of sensory input to stay regulated throughout the day. Over the years, I have experimented with what works well for them and what brings on the no-good -very-bad meltdowns!

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in Sensory Solutions by Jamie Schwed

Before we dive into how color preference can influence learning ability in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and developmental delay, let’s talk about the reason why children with ASD and developmental delay do not favor bright colors, especially yellow. Normally, neurotypical children love red and blue colors, that’s why so many toys and cartoons

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in Sensory Solutions by Lio Chon Fu, MD

Most people have some degree of aversion to the sensory-rich dental experience. The sights, sounds, smells, tastes, and metallic instruments are literally in our faces.  We can’t move or escape, while the dentist contorts our lips, sprays water while our mouths are open, and we try to breathe and communicate. It’s a challenge whether special

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in Sensory Solutions by Louis Siegelman, DDS

Many people use hand fidgets to relieve stress and anxiety, to help focus, or just for plain fun. Stress balls, putty, and anything squishy and squeezy are helpful because they’re soothing, calming, and enjoyable to fidget with. Sensory items have helped people of all ages, from adults sitting at a desk at work to children

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in Sensory Solutions by Christina Kozlowski, OTR/L

Touch is the first sensation that starts evolving in the womb at five weeks. The early development of the touch (tactile) system provides an essential foundation for emerging social and communicative behaviors (Cascio, 2010). According to Kranowitz (2005), the touch system layers our bodies and gives us information about surrounding physical entities. Moreover, it works

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in Sensory Solutions by Aditi Srivastava, MOT, PGC

Sensory rooms are the perfect accompaniment for children on the autism spectrum Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may have issues effectively processing sensory information and may perceive sensation differently. For example, a child may perceive touch sensation as painful or immediately become startled when touched.  Some children are extremely sensitive to noises such as

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in Sensory Solutions by Christina Kozlowski, OTR/L