New Book Offers Encouragement to Parents of Fussy Eaters

Attack of the Killer Banana
by Shannon Thiry

A new book, Attack of the Killer Banana, by Shannon Thiry, offers help and support to parents of children who are extremely fussy eaters.

Lots of parents complain about their children being “fussy eaters.” But with a little bit of encouragement,1 their kids outgrow their problems.

Helpful New Book Offers Encouragement to Parents of Fussy Eaters

For a small cohort of parents, however, “fussy eating” is a huge problem. There’s literally nothing that can persuade their children to eat something they don’t like.

Shannon Thiry, the author of Attack of the Killer Banana, is one of those parents. Like many, her baby boy started out eating fine. As time went on, he would eat less and less as his aversion grew more intense. But it would take years before she would discover that her son had autism or that the underlying cause of his feeding issues was sensory processing disorder.

While many parents feel alone in their struggles with feeding fussy eaters, the truth is that about 25 percent of normally developing children have some kind of feeding issue.[1] Of the children who present their problems at age two, only one third have resolved by age four. The stats for children with developmental difficulties are far higher: between 70 to 89 percent have “feeding problems.” 3

Living in a regional area of Queensland, Australia, it was hard for Shannon to get access to health services and personnel that could, firstly, recognize the problem, and secondly, find achievable solutions.

Shannon wrote her story, Attack of the Killer Banana, as an encouragement for other parents who might be facing the same issues with fussy eating. “I couldn’t find the book I was looking for, so I wrote it myself,” Shannon states about the book. “I hope parents feel validated in their struggles and can take comfort from knowing that they are definitely not alone.”

Shannon lives in Queensland, Australia, with her husband and two children.

Order a copy

[1] Let’s be honest. Encouragement = bribery. We all know it’s true.



This article was featured in Issue 67 – Preparing for Adulthood With Autism

Leave a reply