As the world continues to seek better ways to support children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), there’s a growing need to use physical methods to facilitate their development. In a report released by the World Health Organization, at least one child out of 160 has autism. ASD symptoms vary from child to child, but many

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Okonkwo Noble

From the moment my son, Charlie, 12, was born, he’s been the consummate sports fan, attending nearly all his older brothers’ events. In the early days when he napped in his infant carrier, and throughout the following years as he explored new playgrounds at various ballfields, he never minded watching. But as he got older,

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Elizabeth Alterman

On the pathway to adopting a healthy lifestyle, the exercise experience contains valuable opportunities for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) to practice adaptive communication and socialization skills. To ensure a safe, enjoyable fitness experience, parents and caregivers may consider accessing the services of a certified personal trainer (CPT). Depending upon the individual’s level of

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Joshua Garrin, PhD

Whether in the gym, residential, or outdoor setting, engagement in routine exercise can help individuals on the autism spectrum to dramatically improve their physical, mental, emotional, and social wellbeing. As time spent in the fitness setting creates opportunities to develop communication skills, facilitate sensory processing, and enhance social awareness, exercise task demands gradually transform into

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Joshua Garrin, PhD

With each click, swipe, and scroll through our news feeds, new tips, trends, and techniques for achieving better health make it impossible to ignore what we already know to be true: Along with proper diet and adequate sleep, routine exercise is one of the keys to a maintaining a healthy lifestyle. However, due to the

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Joshua Garrin, PhD

Children with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) move a lot—as a parent, family member or loved one of someone with ASD you can probably attest to that.  There can be constant movement in an ASD household: circles, spinning, running in the yard, in the house, jumping off of couches (or bookcases, or coffee tables…I’m not judging,

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Josephine Blagrave

According to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), about 1 in 5 children aged 6-19 years old is obese¹. This means that they have excess body fat, putting their body mass index (BMI) scores above the 95th percentile. While there are a number of factors that may contribute to these statistics, the reality is that

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Alescia Ford-Lanza, MS, OTR/L, ATP

Physical activity is an important part of everyone’s life and well-being. Based on Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommendations, children under 18 should have a minimum of 60 minutes of physical activity every day. Adults should have 30 minutes of physical activity five days a week. Recent studies have revealed, however, people are

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Alfred Chavira

“There are many reasons to encourage fitness activities for youth and adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders.  Regular physical activity has been shown to enhance both behavior and mood.” Fred R. Volkmar, M.D. Irving B. Harris Professor, Director – Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, Chief of Child Psychiatry, Yale New Haven Hospital, Editor

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Adam Leapley

“Wow, how did you get him/her to do that?,” parents often ask me. Whether their seven-year-old son just performed a jump for the first time or their seventeen-year-old daughter triumphed over a Dynamax ball squat, Sandbell slam, and bear walk combo, one of the highlights of my profession is demonstrating capabilities. And it isn’t quite

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in Autism Exercise and Fitness by Eric Chessen, MS